Growing Dog Head & Body Tips

A lot of people wish to see their dog as an adult but don’t know how they grow. Here are some tips over this topic to learn how to make your dog head and body grow and what you need to do so in order achieve that target.

I’ve collected a lot of tips on the topic to help you out with the process, hope you will enjoy reading this article. If you don’t know their growth chart, find out it here how big will my puppy get. Let’s start straight away.

  1. The old saying goes that you can’t judge a book by its cover, suggesting that first impressions based upon the look of something don’t give you much information. However a recent study suggests that for dogs, their appearance (in terms of their size and their head shape), may well give you a lot of information about the personality and behavioral characteristics of the dog.

    2. Although the initial domestication of dogs may have occurred 14,000 years or more in the past, humans have continued to transform dogs to fulfill many different functions associated with guarding, herding, hunting, or simply companionship. Our selective breeding of dogs has modified their size and their shape dramatically so that the more than 400 recorded breeds of dogs are easily recognizable based on their physical characteristics. It also appears that there is some correlation between a dog’s head shape and the functions that they perform for humans; for example the sighthounds (who pursue game over open ground) tend to have long narrow heads, while many of the guarding breeds tend to have more square shaped heads.

    3. he physical variables that the researchers were interested in were primarily the height and weight of the dog, and the shape of the dog’s head. While the first two variables are obvious the shape of the dog’s head requires a bit of explanation. There is a lot of variability in head shape among the various dog breeds. Put simply, head shape ranges from the long-headed dogs, technically called “dolichocephalic” (such as the Afghan Hound or the Greyhound) to the broader wide-skulled dogs technically called “brachycephalic” (such as the Pug or French Bulldog). In between are the “mesocephalic” (sometimes called “mesaticephalic”) which would include the Golden Retriever or the Beagle. You can see some examples below.

    4. The dog’s weight also predicted certain personality characteristics. Heavier dogs tended to be bolder, more inquisitive, and attentive. Lighter dogs tended to be more cautious and fearful.

    5. Head shape also predicted some differences in temperament. The brachycephalic dogs seem to be more engaged with their owners with a higher interest in human-directed play. On the other hand these short-faced dogs were more defensive when faced with a difficult to interpret situation (such as seeing a person dressed like a ghost). The dolichocephalic dogs seem to be less likely to engage in object play, especially with unfamiliar humans. However these long-faced dogs were not as easily startled and recovered more quickly when an unexpected event occurred.

    6. Although obesity is far too common in dogs today; there are also dogs with the opposite problem. In fact, some dogs are downright skinny and I know; I have one of those dogs. But I know why my dog is thin; he’s active, runs and plays hard, and is always ready to go. Here are some things I’ve learned as I live with this dog and try to keep weight on him.

    7. Your dog’s veterinarian is your partner in your dog’s health care so talk to your vet before you make any changes regarding your dog’s weight. Ask your vet to perform a complete physical as there are a number of diseases or health issues that can affect weight loss (or gain) as well as appetite. You’ll want to eliminate these prior to beginning a weight gain program. In addition, ask your veterinarian for a goal weight for your dog.